A Tribute to Fallen Police Dogs, Dox and Lyon

Dox and Lyon police dogs tribute

A tear-jerking tribute to two fallen police dogs, Dox and Lyon, in Brazil who died in the line of duty.

CURITIBA, Brazil – Quick, determined and with impeccable senses of smell and hearing, Dox and Lyon lost their lives during a recent police operation.

The two dogs were fatally shot while pursuing suspects in a forest near the city of Ribeirão das Neves on behalf of the Minas Gerais Military Police on May 17, 2011.

As soon as the trained German Shepherds located the hiding criminals, they started barking to alert officers they had located the suspects.

“One of the fugitives fired nine rounds and five hit Dox and four hit Lyon,” says Capt. Paulo Roberto Alves, commander of the Minas Gerais Military Police (PMMG) Shock Brigade, where the dogs had trained and served. “They gave their lives to protect police officers.”

Prior to their cremation, the officers spent a few minutes with the Dox and Lyon’s remains, paying respect to their fallen heroes.

“It was one of the saddest moments of my life,” says Officer Luís Antônio de Castro Maciel, who was assigned to work with Dox five years ago. “It was like he was family to me.”

Officer Welly Lucindo, who was assigned to work with Lyon more than two years ago, says he “lost a friend.”

“What happened was a real tragedy,” he says. “I’m never going to forget him.”

According to Infosurhoy, a permanent memorial is being built in memory of the fallen heroes.

The courage shown by Dox and Lyon, who had been on the force for six and two years, respectively, inspired the organization to create a Hall of Heroes. It’s expected to be built this year at the headquarters of the PMMG’s 1st Company for Special Missions, in Contagem.

The hall will contain the ashes of dogs lost in service, as well as plaques and their photographs.

World’s Smallest Working Dog, a Yorkie, Sets Guinness World Record

Lucy world's smallest working dog a Yorkie

A mini Yorkshire terrier from New Jersey is now the holder of a very big world record: world’s smallest working dog.

Lucy, who weighs just 2 1/2 pounds, was named the world’s smallest working dog last week by Guinness World Records. In the process, she doggedly beat out the previous record holder: Momo, an eight-year-old chihuahua from Japan that works as a police search-and-rescue dog.

The tiny terrier makes her rounds each week, visiting hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation centers. She also works with children with disabilities, and troubled youth.

 

Service Dogs Help Vets with PTSD | The Story of Jeff and Tazie

Jeff and Tazie outside

Jeff Mitchell and his dog Tazzie

Jeff Mitchell, now a medically retired Army sergeant, served two tours in Iraq. When Jeff returned home in February of 2006, it became clear to him that something was not right. He became violent, drank heavily, and started having frequent flashbacks, nightmares and auditory hallucinations. He was eventually diagnosed with having PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).

After years of futile attempts at treatment, Jeff’s condition began to improve a few months ago after a group called Paws4Vets paired him with a service dog, Tazie, who had undergone her own traumas. Ironically, Tazie is a dog who was rescued from the war zone in Afghanistan by Paws4Vets and also suffers from PTSD. The two bonded, and the companionship between the two literally helped bring Jeff out of the basement, where he had been hiding for nine months since his return from active duty.

Jeff’s goal in life now is to help people like him, but he realizes that’s going to take a long time.

An estimated 20% (approximately 400,000) of deployed vets suffer from PTSD.

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Here is a video of both Paws4Vets and Jeff Mitchell being featured on CNN.

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Film: National Disaster Search Dog Foundation (US)

Search Dog Foundation

Disaster search dogs and their handlers save lives in times of crisis. Learn more about the foundation that takes the call to action.

Very well made video/film about the search and rescue dogs.  Video courtesy of explore.org site.

explore is a philanthropic community whose mission is to champion the selfless acts of others, to create a portal into the soul of humanity and to inspire lifelong learning. Our dream is to create a destination of trust. – Founder, Charles Annenberg Weingarten

 

Roselle, the guide dog who saved her blind master in Tower One on 9/11

roselle-with-medal

Here is an excerpt from Michael Hingson, who is blind, about his faithful guide dog, Roselle, who led him down 78 flights of stairs in Tower One of the World Trade Center on that fateful date of 9/11/2001.

  “It is strange for me to be writing this article while I have feelings of both sadness and joy in my heart.  Nevertheless, it is something which must be done.

Roselle was born on March 12, 1998 at Guide Dogs for the Blind in San Rafael, California.  After her time with puppy raisers she went back to Guide Dogs for the Blind for training.  I think I first met her on November 22, 1999.  It was obvious from the very beginning that we were a perfect match.  Roselle was my fifth guide dog.  I could tell that she would be an excellent guide from our very first walk together.  What took me a few days to discover was that Roselle was also quite a character; I constantly referred to her as a pixie.

On September 11, 2001 Roselle and I were in our office on the 78th floor of Tower One of the World Trade Center when the tower was struck by American Airlines flight 11 which had been hijacked and was being controlled by terrorists. All I want to say here is that Roselle did an incredible job.  She remained poised and calm through the entire day.   I would not be alive today if it weren’t for Roselle.

In 2004, Roselle was diagnosed with immune mediated thrombocytopenia, a condition which caused her body to attack her blood platelets.  Through medications we were able to control the disease and Roselle was able to continue guiding.  As usual, she worked like a trooper and never once exhibited pain nor discomfort.

In February 2007 during a normal checkup we learned that some of Roselle’s kidney values were changing for the worse.  It was decided that the medication regimen on which Roselle had been placed as well as the stress of guiding were the causes for her kidney value changes.  Roselle retired from guide work in March of 2007.

In 2010, Roselle began exhibiting some chronic back pain.  We immediately took Roselle to her vet and started her on a treatment of acupuncture, some other back adjustments, and herbs which altogether mostly eliminated her chronic back pain.

Earlier this year [2011] we noticed that Roselle was beginning to have a harder time standing up on her own, although once she was standing she loved to continue her daily walks.  She stopped playing tug bone with Fantasia and Africa, but she still enjoyed lying in the sun, eating, kissing everybody in sight, and barking at the doorbell.  Her ability to stand on her own grew worse throughout the first half of this year.

Last week she began exhibiting some other signs of distress and pain.  On Friday, June 24, 2011 she had to be taken to her vet as she had begun vomiting blood.  It is suspected that somehow she had developed a stomach ulcer.  Also, it was discovered that her red blood cell count had dropped significantly.  Friday evening she was taken to the Pet Emergency and Specialty Center where she was well known and would receive over night care. She had spent many hours with Doctor Harb and the other staff working through her IMT issues.  They had also helped her in January 2009 when she developed gastric torsion and had to undergo emergency surgery to untwist her stomach.

Yesterday, Sunday, June 26, we visited her in the evening only to see her condition continuing to deteriorate.  She was in a lot of pain and discomfort.  There was no one cause for her discomfort, but Doctor Bowie of the PESC felt that some of her immune mediated related conditions had returned in addition to the possible stomach ulcer.  After much consultation and discussion we all came to agreement that the best thing we could do to help Roselle was to assist her in crossing the Rainbow Bridge and go to her friends Linnie and Panama.  At 8:52 last evening she crossed the bridge and, I am sure, is now more comfortable and has all the doorbells she wants to bark at.”

This was posted on June 28, 2011, by Mike Hingson.  For the full story, you may visit his website here.

May you rest in peace, Roselle.

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